The French chocolate mousse

French chocolate mousse is one recipe with true universal appeal. It is sweet, light and fluffy and has that intense chocolate taste that appeals to almost anyone.

But as delicious as a chocolate mousse can be, there is one hurdle you need to overcome before you can kick back and inhale that chocolatey indulgence during a Netflix binge. And that is; knowing how to crack the code to achieve velvety perfection with your chocolate mousse.

(The step by step instructions are provided  in the video below)

Ingredients you need for 4 to 6 people (depending on serving size)

– 180 grams of 70% cacao dark chocolate ( best quality possible)
– 100 ml of full fat cream 35 % minimum (also called heavy
whipping cream)
– 50 ml of full cream Milk
– 60 grams of caster sugar
– A pinch of salt
– 7 eggs whites (have to be beaten into a meringue)

Note: If you want something sweeter you can increase the amount of sugar shown in the recipe below.

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After doing some research I found that there are just 2 main skills to master to make the perfect french chocolate mousse:

  1. How to properly melt chocolate and transform it into a beautiful silky chocolate sauce.
  2. How to keep that chocolate sauce relatively runny to be able to handle it when it’s off the heat and avoid it clumping when mixed with other ingredients.

The good news is that all of the above can be overcome if you are mindful of  2 simple things: Temperature and fat content

Let’s start with the theory behind melting chocolate into a delicious silky sauce( courtesy of what’s cookingamerica.com)

The preferred way to melt chocolate is: The double Boiler Method In this method, the chocolate is either broken, grated, or cut in pieces, melted over hot, simmering water, in a double boiler.

Definition of a double boiler:  A double boiler is a specialized set of pans consisting of a saucepan that holds hot water, and a bowl that fits securely over the saucepan.

Chocolate is placed in the top bowl and allowed to melt over gentle, indirect heat.  If you do not own a double boiler, any metal or glass bowl that fits snugly over the top of a saucepan can be used.  Fill the bottom pan with just enough hot water that does not touch the bottom of the top pan or bowl.  NOTE: The simmering water (not boiling) must never touch the bottom of the pan or bowl.

Either break up, grate, or chop the chocolate into small even pieces.

Melt chocolate slowly over low heat.  Chocolate is very delicate and can become lumpy or grainy if overheated.  Do not let dark chocolate get above 115 degrees F.  Milk and white chocolates, which are more heat sensitive, should not be heated above 110 degrees F.  Use an instant-read thermometer to check the chocolate’s internal temperature while melting.

Stir chocolate slowly and gently occasionally until melted.  Begin stirring the chocolate with a rubber spatula when the outside edges start to liquefy.  Stirring prematurely will actually slow down the melting process.  When melting a large amount of chocolate, melt 1/3 of the chocolate at a time, allowing each addition to begin to melt before adding the next.  Stir frequently to distribute the heat evenly.

Remove the pan or bowl from the double boiler as soon as the chocolate is nearly melted.  Continue gently stirring until it is smooth and shiny.

Before pouring the melted chocolate into another container, be sure to wipe the exterior of the pan dry to prevent water drips.

Next, to ensure your chocolate sauce stays runny and can be combine with other ingredients ( in this instance with a meringue) just follow the guidelines below:

Chocolate can be safely melted with a small amount of liquid, such as milk, cream, butter, or alcohol if they are placed in the pan or bowl together (the same time).

Chocolate should never be melted with very small amounts of liquid.  The amount of liquid added must be at least 25% of the chocolate.  This prevents the dry particles (cocoa and sugar) in the chocolate from binding together and becoming lumpy:

Chocolate with 55% to 60% cacao – 1 tablespoon liquid for every 2 ounces chocolate

High-percentage chocolates with 60% to 70% cacao – 1 1/2 tablespoons for every 2 ounces chocolate

Cold liquids should never be added to melted chocolate, as they can cause the chocolate to seize.  Instead, ensure that your liquids are warm (but not boiling) when you add them to chocolate.

That’s it. You have all the vital information you need to successfully make a French chocolate mousse.

lastly before you start, remember that all of your utensils, bowls and ingredients used (even the eggs) must be be kept at room temperature. so for instance do remember to take your eggs out of the fridge in advance before making your meringue.

If you feel ready to make a French chocolate mousse:

The step by step instructions are provided  in the video below.

Ingredients you need for 4 to 6 people (depending on serving size)

– 180 grams of 70% cacao dark chocolate ( best quality possible)
– 100 ml of full fat cream 35 % minimum (also called heavy
whipping cream)
– 50 ml of full cream Milk
– 60 grams of caster sugar
– A pinch of salt
– 7 eggs whites (have to be beaten into a meringue)

Note: If you want something sweeter you can increase the amount of sugar shown in the recipe below.

Utensils I used in the video:
Glass bowl : https://amzn.to/2Fv0VBr
Spatulas: https://amzn.to/2KteB3p
Whisk:https://amzn.to/2HIvftY

If you want more chocolatey inspiration check this hot chocolate recipe:

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